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  #1  
Old 02-04-2007, 05:22 PM
DanielleH DanielleH is offline
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Default Recording An Electric Guitar

How do I record an electric guitar with Pro-tools? Do I need a mic to record out of the amp or can I record it through the MBOX? if so how?
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  #2  
Old 02-04-2007, 06:00 PM
M.Brane M.Brane is offline
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Default Re: Recording An Electric Guitar

I'd recommend micing an amp if you have good sounding amp in a good room. You can use an amp simulator like a POD to record direct too. Plugging a guitar straight into the M-Box will work, but likely won't sound very good.

50% of the sound of an electric guitar is the amp/speaker. Simulators can sound decent with a lot of tweaking, but there's nothing like capturing a real amp moving air IMHO especially from the player's
perspective. As a player who grew up playing through tube amps I find it difficult to deliver an inspired performance going DI.
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Old 02-05-2007, 01:52 AM
Holly73 Holly73 is offline
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Default Re: Recording An Electric Guitar

Don't know, what quality you want to acheive. If you want the best, just record a real amp, like M.Brane mentioned. But it is quite tricky to get really good results this way. For some basic guitar recordings, just try to use plugins like Amplitube (Le version might have been included with your PTLE) or similar. IMO, the results are good enough for home recording or some backing tracks. Just give it a try. If you don't like it you can still record your real amp.
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Old 02-05-2007, 10:36 AM
Stiff Stiff is offline
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Default Re: Recording An Electric Guitar

Recording your amp will probably be harder for you than to simply go line-in or through a pod. Just plug your guitar cable into the mbox and put some Amplitube or Guitar rig on it OR connect the guitar to a pod and from there to the mbox.

Good luck!
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Old 02-05-2007, 01:12 PM
The Dougfather The Dougfather is offline
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Default Re: Recording An Electric Guitar

Hi Stiff, over the years i've tried several methods for what is the low level bedroom guitarist and i personally find using a POD the simplest and most effective. I recently made an instructional guitar DVD and whereas the behringer v-amp sounds terrible the POD is actually quite convincing.

Don't get me wrong i love micing up instruments and to be fair that is what recording is all about, practicing mic techniques, various different positions etc. However if you have neighbours, not a great selection of mics and a naff acoustic space then the POD is perfect. Another downside to trying to use any emulation plugs is the latency in Pro Tools if you want to monitor, the original Mbox will only get down to 256 samples and it's not nice.

One thing i plan to do for the future is buy a 2 way splitter pedal so i can send a dry signal in to Pro Tools and the emulated POD sound, possibly look at combining the two. I believe behringer make one for around £15.

Take it easy
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Old 02-05-2007, 10:56 PM
Stiff Stiff is offline
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Default Re: Recording An Electric Guitar

Quote:
Hi Stiff, over the years i've tried several methods for what is the low level bedroom guitarist and i personally find using a POD the simplest and most effective.
I agree, and while I can see micing an amp is optimal for some people, you also have to put money into the equation, the POD alternative might be cheaper than the amps one is going for, and it is especially a cheaper alternative if you want to be able to use various of classic amp sound. For beginners micing amps is more less something to interfere with the workflow since it will take some effort to get even a decent sound

Quote:
Another downside to trying to use any emulation plugs is the latency in Pro Tools if you want to monitor, the original Mbox will only get down to 256 samples and it's not nice.
Well, that depends on who you ask, the latest work I did for a client was recorded with Guitar rig on an mbox with the latency and all, though I certainly rather would've worked WITHOUT the latency. I normally don't use software amp sims though.
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Old 02-06-2007, 01:59 AM
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comprodman comprodman is offline
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Default Re: Recording An Electric Guitar

I have just been recording a few sessions, one of the session we couldn't use an amp (it was very late and people needed to sleep) I used the Amplitube Plugin with the fender DI'd into my 002 and the amp sent on the Foldback so the guitarist could hear the effect.

We where very suprised at how excellent it sounded, so good infact the guy is actually going to get Amplitube himself.

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Old 02-06-2007, 08:24 PM
nedorama nedorama is offline
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Default Re: Recording An Electric Guitar

I use several different ways to record, and each has its own benefits/drawbacks:

mic - amp - I have a 70's silverface princeton that's not too loud, but sounds great close-mic'd and with a condenser 1-2 feet away as a 2nd mic. I've used it on electric guitar and even on bass. Benefit - sounds great, and mine is permanently set up with an SM57 right where I want it on the grille. Drawback: unless you're playing the amp quietly, can get evicted if you're trying to get any volume; some amps only sound great when cranked. This method also doesn't work when the kids are sleeping.

Direct - Amplitube/Izotope Trash - For quick parts when I'm just trying to get song structure ideas down, this works well. I have both Amplitube and Amplitube II and sometimes will just use presets I've done in Amplitube that work and are less processor intenstive - especially when you have 3-4 tracks going. Izotope Trash is awesome as well for guitar parts. Benefit - you can record it DI and apply the amp sound you want, and then change it later. Downside: can be a CPU hog unless you bounce tracks if you have lots of amplitube tracks going, some don't sound as good as the real thing. It's also worth splitting your signal if you're mic'd to an amp to have a DI track to do things with later.

Rack - I have an ADA MP1 and a Mesa Boogie V-Twin - both have some sounds I have come up with over the past 12 years I can't part with. Combined with an SPX90 (12 bit glory), it's lo-fi, but that helps - echoes are rounded off, not crystal clear. To get those sounds into the 002R, I have ADA's Microcab II (http://reviews.harmony-central.com/r...croCab+II/10/1). this is a good speaker emulator that lets you dial in the sound of the speaker and to me, sounds great. I can get completely cranked Marshall/Rectifier tones in Pro Tools and not worry about waking up anyone (monitoring on headphones, of course). They are discontinued, but go for around $150-$300 used. If you can get the Microcab II, the later version can accept pre-amp or power amp outs, so you can use it with an amp head. Also has an attached power cord vs. a wall wart. I have two just in case one ever goes, but I've had them both since 94 with no problems.

Pod - don't have one, but have friends that use it and love it - no latency and no load on their system. Plus, for gigging it can be a lifesaver if portability is a must. The original ones are also becoming very affordable - less than $150.

Enjoy.
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