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  #1  
Old 01-02-2008, 02:12 PM
Clint Hernandez Clint Hernandez is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 6
Default Mixing in 5.1 rookie techniques.

Why would I need to output in 5.1 via hardware?

I actually have no clue about mixing what so ever. Though I know it is complicated.
But I do know most mixing takes place in large facilities, where one guy or girl does effects, another music, another adr, etc, I don't need a complicated system like that.

I only desire to work on my own films, where I will have the m/e and dialogue on the same Mac tower system. Being said, I want to create my own approach to mixing, or learn that the complicated 5.1 is indeed necessary, more worth it, and more expensive.

Correct me if I am wrong, is this how most people are doing it? Lucas sound, other good sound studios.

1 - l - Music / Effects /
2 - c - Dialogue only
3 - R - Music / Effects /
4 - LS - Some Effecst and Dialogue when needed
5 - RS - Some Effecst and Dialogue when needed
6 - LFE - Bass Mix Effects only/ Bass from Music

This is what I want to do;
Bring in all my elements into the protool le 6.9 I have. For the surround sound, for the desired and effects I wish to surround the audience in, simply copy and paste from channels 1,3 into 4,5 and not even enter the mixing module. Then once my mix is complete in the protools le recording module, export as 6 files, one for each track, then assign them in Apack, and I got an .ac3, wallah?

This may be amateurish, but will it even work? Is the hardware 5.1 outputting even necessary at all?

Im using an MBox, I been told to use an mbox pro with the 6 channels, but do I need that? I wish to go all digitally using files, etc.

Yay or nay? Any advice would be appreciated greatly.

Thanks! Happy new years.
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  #2  
Old 01-02-2008, 03:19 PM
hef hef is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: nyc
Posts: 232
Default Re: Mixing in 5.1 rookie techniques.

Quote:

Correct me if I am wrong, is this how most people are doing it? Lucas sound, other good sound studios.

1 - l - Music / Effects /
2 - c - Dialogue only
3 - R - Music / Effects /
4 - LS - Some Effecst and Dialogue when needed
5 - RS - Some Effecst and Dialogue when needed
6 - LFE - Bass Mix Effects only/ Bass from Music



No, thats not how you do it. There is no simple formula to it. Music and effects are usually spread across the LCR not just in the L and R. LFe is for when you want more low frequency impact- usually for explosion or the something huge. your mix should sound good without the LFE and its not usually used for music. you should read this book:

surround book

are you trying to not monitor in 5.1 but create a 5.1 mix? if so, that would be very bad.
if like you say you have 'no clue about mixing' maybe start by mixing stereo before you go 5.1

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Big Yellow Duck, Audio Post NYC
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  #3  
Old 01-03-2008, 01:31 PM
Russ Johnson Russ Johnson is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 1
Default Re: Mixing in 5.1 rookie techniques.

When I click on "surround book" in the previous post it takes me to the reply to post page, not what I assume was meant to be a link to a surround book. Yes? I'd love to know what book you're recommending, could you post it?

Thanks.
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  #4  
Old 01-03-2008, 02:23 PM
Frank Kruse Frank Kruse is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: old europe
Posts: 4,702
Default Re: Mixing in 5.1 rookie techniques.

Quote:

This is what I want to do;
Bring in all my elements into the protool le 6.9 I have. For the surround sound, for the desired and effects I wish to surround the audience in, simply copy and paste from channels 1,3 into 4,5 and not even enter the mixing module. Then once my mix is complete in the protools le recording module, export as 6 files, one for each track, then assign them in Apack, and I got an .ac3, wallah?

This may be amateurish, but will it even work? Is the hardware 5.1 outputting even necessary at all?


You say you work on your own films. Would you shoot your film without looking through the view-finder?

Would you listen to your ipod with only one phone in one of your ears?

Would you mix a stereo track with only one speaker and then simply duplicate the mono track burn to a stereo CD and you´re done?

frank.
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  #5  
Old 01-03-2008, 03:55 PM
Halfmoon Halfmoon is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: California
Posts: 46
Default Re: Mixing in 5.1 rookie techniques.

First off, go for it.

However.....

You're missing a few fundamentals of mixing and of audio-for-film that are likely going to slow you down when you approach surround/multi-channel audio.

I can suggest a few resources for you to get started learning about surround.
1. Digi
Digidesign produced the book Pro Tools Sync and Surround Concepts a few years back that give a very basic introduction to some of the main concepts you'll need to grasp. It includes basics like terminology (for example, what the ".1" actually means in a format like 5.1). You can download it for free from the Support and Downloads / Technical Documents section of the Digi site. If luck is with me, that page can be found here:
<http://www.digidesign.com/index.cfm?...&itemid=23332>

2. Dolby
The Dolby website has loads and loads of info available for download (also for free). I'd suggest starting with the simpler Digi book, above, so you can be equipped to get the most out of the Dolby material.
3. Books
I got a lot out of the book "5urroundSound;Up and Running" by T. Holman. I see there's a second edition now available (try Amazon for more info, I know they carry it). The Dobly docs and Holhman book were how I got over the initial learning curve about surround.

Audio for Film
One more thing: Your original post also touched on some fundamental aspects of audio-for-film (things like track layouts, stems, etc.). Before you worry too much about 5.1 or 7.1 film sound, you'd do yourself a good service by soaking up a bit of the basics. One highly recommended book is "Sound for Film and Television", also by Mr. Holman.

I hope this helps and encourages you to keep at it until you achieve what you want. Keep us posted how it goes.

m
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  #6  
Old 01-03-2008, 04:05 PM
hef hef is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: nyc
Posts: 232
Default Re: Mixing in 5.1 rookie techniques.

sorry, try this:

surround book
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Big Yellow Duck, Audio Post NYC
Mixer/Sound Designer
IMDB Credits
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