Avid Pro Audio Community

Avid Pro Audio Community

How to Join & Post  •  Community Terms of Use  •  Help Us Help You

Knowledge Base Search  •  Community Search  •  Learn & Support


Avid Home Page

Go Back   Avid Pro Audio Community > Pro Tools Software > Getting Started

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-09-2019, 04:26 PM
Lue Lue is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: earth
Posts: 35
Default Book Suggestions (part 2)

Hello,

For the past year I've been on a journey to learn how to make music.
I had no idea what or how to mix, master or even what chords were just to give you an idea. I still very much consider myself a complete noobie.

I had previously asked a question regarding books suggestions. Back then, I had received two really good examples of very useful books. At the time, I didn't know what mixing or mastering was. All I knew was that I wanted to learn. I have bought both of these books and have almost completed them both.

Bob Katz: Mastering Audio
Roey Izhaki: Mixing Audio

However, now that I know what mixing and mastering is and their purpose I now know that I'm missing something very important. I don't know how to arrange at all! I don't know much at all about chords or musical techniques to create a nice musical piece or catchy song. I'm not even sure if such things exist or if I should just be putting random instruments together for whatever I think sounds good. Judging from the books I've read there seems to be some certain structures and instruments in arrangements depending on the feeling and genre of the piece.

Maybe all people do is just try to mimic their favorite songs? I'm not sure. I have a huge problem where I love listening to songs but I have no idea what kind of instrument I'm listening to, therefore I have no way of mimicking it. I especially have trouble identifying different synth instruments. On the off chance I can identify an instrument, I usually download/pay for an instrument plugin or look through my existing libraries for it and can not find the same sound if that makes sense. I understand that EQ can change sounds to a certain extent. I'm thinking maybe there's some kind of trick I don't know about or perhaps the songs on the radio use very special instrument packs or plugins that noobies like me wont know how to get or how to use? So far my favorite plugin I have bought is Trilian which I really love because I love the bass guitar sounds from it. I also love the horn instruments so if you have any plugin recommendations of those I would love to hear it

Any advice is very much appreciated! :)

I'd like to someday create RnB, pop, rock and alternative music. I'd like to pretty much try out everything and then with that experience choose what I like to do most and stick with it.

So, now I am back to ask if anyone has any recommendations on books covering how to arrange a song?
also any online lessons teaching what each instrument sounds like for example how to identify a guitar or certain type of drum in a song?

I know that I can simply look up books on amazon myself but if people on this forum who are professionals have learnt and benefited from a book personally then I'd much prefer these recommendations! :)

thank you for your time.
I appreciate any recommendations or advice :)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-09-2019, 08:11 PM
YYR123's Avatar
YYR123 YYR123 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Austin TX
Posts: 13,652
Default Re: Book Suggestions (part 2)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lue View Post
Hello, For the past year I've been on a journey to learn how to make music....
It’s a lifetime journey, you never arrive you just keep getting better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lue View Post
I don't know how to arrange at all! I don't know much at all about chords or musical techniques to create a nice musical piece or catchy song.
I would suggest that you learn to play an instrument. This will help tremendously. I would say Piano in general, but it’s all up to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lue View Post
Maybe all people do is just try to mimic their favorite songs?
Not a bad place to start, “imitation is the finest form of flattery”

Personally I just play an instrument and the song itself tells me (kind of like the wind whispering to you) what it’s going to be. Seriously

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lue View Post
I'd like to someday create RnB, pop, rock and alternative music. I'd like to pretty much try out everything and then with that experience choose what I like to do most and stick with it.
Learn to play an instrument, the best producers all know how to play, most of them anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lue View Post
So, now I am back to ask if anyone has any recommendations on books covering how to arrange a song?

Listen to good music for years and then your ear and mind will begin better arranging when you write and when you collaborate. Seriously

So it’s a journey, you won’t get there overnight but if you keep it up in 10 years you would be surprised what can happen.
__________________
Daniel
HDX - PT12.5.1 - HD I/O 16x8x8
Win10-Pro (v1709)- 6 Core i7-6850k - ASUS X99 Deluxe ii
D-Command Main Unit - 'Ole Blue


http://www.sknoteaudio.com/ plugins rock and are affordable.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-10-2019, 01:52 AM
Lue Lue is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: earth
Posts: 35
Default Re: Book Suggestions (part 2)

ok thank you for the advice.
I am currently learning to play the keyboard and I am planning to learn the guitar and bass. I do expect for it to take many years to develop the skill and ear for music. I am a bit surprised to hear that there are no techniques for learning music as there is for art, but that is fine. I will do my best to learn on my own!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-10-2019, 10:36 AM
EdwardWilliam's Avatar
EdwardWilliam EdwardWilliam is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Las Vegas & Santa Fe, NM USA
Posts: 58
Default Re: Book Suggestions (part 2)

Lue, there are techniques for learning music! (It’s called pedagogy.) I teach at an audio school for musicians. We cover music theory, which explains chords, scales, and voicing; aural skills, where you learn how to identify, read, and notate music; music history, which provides a views into how composers have written music over the centuries; arranging, which explores what instruments and voices sound interestingly together; students perform in vocal or instrumental ensembles; learn recording and mixing techniques using Pro Tools; and more important, applied lessons in voice, bass, piano, etc. If you can’t do the whole school thing, I strongly recommend that you find a mentor or teacher for an instrument you like, and work with them. Cheers!
http://newmexicohighlands.com/underg...ic-technology/


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
__________________
Edward
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-10-2019, 04:28 PM
AlexLakis AlexLakis is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Annapolis, MD
Posts: 1,244
Default Re: Book Suggestions (part 2)

"Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-10-2019, 06:27 PM
YYR123's Avatar
YYR123 YYR123 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Austin TX
Posts: 13,652
Default Re: Book Suggestions (part 2)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lue View Post
I am a bit surprised to hear that there are no techniques for learning music as there is for art, but that is fine. I will do my best to learn on my own!

Yes sorry as the other poster noted, a school or music teacher will benefit you the most. Direct interaction is the best way.

I have heard Randy Rhodes took lessons from teachers while he was on tour himself
__________________
Daniel
HDX - PT12.5.1 - HD I/O 16x8x8
Win10-Pro (v1709)- 6 Core i7-6850k - ASUS X99 Deluxe ii
D-Command Main Unit - 'Ole Blue


http://www.sknoteaudio.com/ plugins rock and are affordable.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-11-2019, 05:09 AM
musicman691 musicman691 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: The Soprano State (NJ)
Posts: 16,292
Default Re: Book Suggestions (part 2)

A music school like written about above is one way and so is bare-bones music lessons without all the theory. Way back in the Dark Ages (1960) I started taking lessons on accordion and then after abut 8 years started in on the piano. My piano teacher was the same fellow I had that taught me accordion the last 2 years. I got lucky - was able to skip the music school thing as this teacher was the music arranger for Skitch Henderson when he was the leader of the Tonight Show band. Continued on with the accordion lessons at the same time and went so far beyond the normal course books my teacher had me dive into the piano books on accordion. Try playing the Hanon or Czerny piano exercises on the squeezebox

In 1966 I started in on guitar lessons because the high school I was going to had Friday guitar masses (Jesuit high school in Philly) and I wanted to play in them. I'd always wanted to play guitar but my parents didn't want me to and which was why I got stuck with the accordion. We made a deal where if I took a year's worth of guitar lessons and stuck with it they'd let me play. This was all the lessons I ever took and I tend to do pretty good if I say so myself. I wouldn't mind taking lessons as my fingerstyle kinda sucks.

Drums - completely self-taught and picked it up by osmosis back when I played in groups decades ago. No Neil Peart though

Then there's those who are naturals at what instrument they play like Lindsey Buckingham. No lessons and from what I understand he can't read music. And he's done well for himself regardless of his falling out with Fleetwood Mac.

So there's all kinds of ways to go on this music journey. Here's a tip though especially when learning a keyboard instrument like piano - get someone to show you good posture when playing especially a percussive instrument like piano. That's right - piano is considered a percussive instrument because the strings are struck with hammers unlike a harpsichord where the strings are plucked. Poor posture will give you all kinds of back and wrist problems and not only will your playing technique suffer but you'll get frustrated.

Don't measure progress by finishing a book or two of lesson material. Measure progress by how comfortable you are sitting down to play and things just flow from the fingers. You'd be amazed at how your own inner muso comes out. It might be John Cage one day and Van Cliburn the next time
__________________
Jack
See profile for system details
iMac dead & retired as of 11/4/17

QAPLA!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-11-2019, 02:13 PM
DonaldM's Avatar
DonaldM DonaldM is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 4,001
Default Re: Book Suggestions (part 2)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lue View Post
ok thank you for the advice.
I am currently learning to play the keyboard and I am planning to learn the guitar and bass. I do expect for it to take many years to develop the skill and ear for music. I am a bit surprised to hear that there are no techniques for learning music as there is for art, but that is fine. I will do my best to learn on my own!

I would suggest you learn music theory. Here's a good place to start. The more theory you know, the better able you'll be to compose, arrange and all that. A book like this can be a big help.
__________________
"Never believe anything you hear in a song." Tyrion Lannister, Game of Thrones
Owner: Dragon Rock Productions LLC
Dell XPS 435T/9000 Win-10 Pro 24gig RAM
IntelCore i7 CPU 920@2.67GHz
Pro Tools 2018.12
Focusrite Scarlett 8i6


Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
3 Part Q? musicalavtech Virtual Instruments 4 04-12-2009 06:59 PM
Suggestions for 8 part male vocals (a capella)? joviyan ProControl, Control|24, Command|8 0 11-24-2007 10:49 AM
Book Suggestions Paul Cypert 003, Mbox 2, Digi 002, original Mbox, Digi 001 (Win) 3 11-10-2003 01:09 PM
Red Book VS. Orange Book>>what's the difference? dex Digidesign Hardware & Software 1 10-22-1999 10:51 AM
Red Book VS Orange Book>>what's the difference? dex Tips & Tricks 0 10-19-1999 12:06 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:45 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2008, Jelsoft Enterprises Limited. Forum Hosted By: URLJet.com