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  #11  
Old 02-13-2004, 12:15 PM
basschair basschair is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

Hey silence

Man, do I empathize. I'm a teacher right now(elementary), though my training/education is in music. I just can't deal with this anymore, and I'm trying to move on right now. If I could get back to teaching college, I'd be thrilled...but those jobs are few and far between. Still, I'm trying. I can't quit for very similar reasons as yours...at least not until I've landed the new job. Crap!

Just because you have reasons not to quit your job doesn't mean you can't look for reasons to quit. Check the job-posting websites, send out resumes, make some calls. And when it finally happens, run away from your current job like you've never run before!
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  #12  
Old 02-13-2004, 12:33 PM
silence_of_stone silence_of_stone is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

Basschair? You are a teacher? Thats a noble job pal. But I bet the rugrats are driving you bonkers. I was going to be a teacher once, but my mom, who teaches, talked me out of it. Maybe I should rethink...
Intel, My dad owns a corporation that he is not using anymore. Me and my dad are getting together with his lawyer to have the name changed to my studio name, and have the ownership trnasferred to me so I will be able to keep that separate from my personal finances... can you say write-off?
Good idea about scouring for business... one thing i was planning on doing was to go to the ritzy neighborhoods and contact every piano teacher I can... this way I might could even pick up some rich debutant piano recital recordings too. Just like a wedding photographer, it might be a good value-added type gig, easy, and some money. I am into the money a lot, but got no realistic dreams about making me rich from recording. I just got make the ends meet.
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  #13  
Old 02-13-2004, 12:58 PM
basschair basschair is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

Yup...second grade this year, all subjects. It's not that I don't like teaching or kids. It's just that my wife taught, and I needed to work after finishing college. I've never been interested in teaching elementary mainly because it is 100% politically controlled, and it drives me absolutely ape-s#!*... It also severely limits how much time I can spend writing and playing music...so, I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
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  #14  
Old 02-13-2004, 01:12 PM
doylemusic doylemusic is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

Silence

Sorry to hear of the stress you are going through. I can relate somewhat...five years ago, I was a Grocery Store Manager at the biggest chain in town. The pay was decent and I was climbing the ladder, but the stress and hours were killing me. The biggest part was my heart wasn't in it. In addition to that I wanted to buy a house but was still reeling from stupid credit handlings in the past.

I made a decision that I was gonna make something happen. Fast forward five years...

Now I work in the IT dept for a fortune 500 company. The pay is 30% better, the hours are better. While there is still some stress involved, it's a different more manageable kind of stress. I can go home (to my new house) and relax in the studio, working on my tunes and doing some recording-for-hire on the side.

Bottom line is, most of us have been through what you are going through. All I can say is continue with the plan you have so you can achieve those goals (house, etc...). Before you know it, you'll be looking back at this situation smiling knowing that you are the better man because of it. Besides, "...the sun will come out tomorrow"

Hang in there man.

p.s. make a Y2k clock that counts down your days to freedom!
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  #15  
Old 02-13-2004, 01:19 PM
silence_of_stone silence_of_stone is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

you know a couple of years ago when I joined this forum, I jsut had a vibe... a feeling that this was a place of good people. I know some folks complain about digi not letting folks talk freely here, but I tell you in certain ways, it keeps the good folks hanging around. This place is full of people like me, and I just appreciate everyone here for thier understanding and support.
Its nice to see success stories, and jsut stories about people getting on with less stress...its so encouraging.
Hard work is not something that bothers me... I like hard work, but I do not handle consistant stress well, so I just need mark my calender up and hang on for the countdown. Thanks guys:) I feel better now about it.
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  #16  
Old 02-13-2004, 01:47 PM
Bastiaan Bastiaan is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

Now for a story with a different approach....

Some years ago i was basically forced to change carreers. I used to be a sys-admin/net-admin/helpdesk guy at cityhall... Then things turned around and i was looking for a new profession. I understand the bore stuff, even though all this happened before it really hit. Basically i was starting to get unhappy because of creativeness not being put to a use. Back then i was already volunteering for the local TV-station, and loving it, so i decided to try it for real now (becoming a professional video-editor). I was able to get my 3 month crashcourse payed my my former employer, along with 2 1/2 years of money (not much, but also no need for me to grab any job or to apply for some job twice a week...). I did that school, along with a year of apprenticeship (payed, though not that much....). After that i hit rockbottom for a month, and then i got THE call from a job-agency in Hilversum (our version of TV Hollywood). They needed someone to fill in for one or two months. To cut a long story short....they liked what i did, and i got employed there. Later i switched jobs to a different company, and there i still work.

Moral of the story: some unwanted thing, maybe even scary thing can be very very good for you. I have this job now with incredible levels of stress, but usually i kinda like it. Makes you work for real, and the kick when you beat the deadline is quite big.

Having lived through all of this makes me less scared of the unsecure heading of my employer. Somehow i will survive. Other job? So be it. Less money? So be it. I have to move? So be it...but i dont think so.....

And yet another moral. It's very very very important you like what you do. I usually go to work with pleasure. If that would change for me i would start to look around again....
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  #17  
Old 02-13-2004, 02:56 PM
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The Weed The Weed is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

Silence,

Like Cliff and the others I've been through it a number of times. The job or boss or both you don't like, which turns into can't stomach. Losing your personality because you've withdrawn into yourself so far because you dislike your job so much. Late nights wondering how the bills are going to be paid when your AP far exceeds your AR.

I've changed careers and businesses a few times and I've learned a few lessons that work for me, YMMV:

1. Burn no bridges. Do the finger thing and donuts in the parking lot in your mind, but not for real. Leave them smiling when you go. In the meantime, keep the goal of leaving uppermost in your mind. Visualize it constantly, plan for the day, feel how relieved you will be. Eventually that day will come and you will be released.

2. Recognize when it's time to move on/make a change. I stayed in my first career job long past the time I should have left. When I finally did, I realized how hard it had been on me and promised myself I would try to recognize early the signs of unhappiness and make changes as quickly as possible

3. When I started my first business I lost a lot of money, but took a hard look at where I was, what the financial prospects were and realized I had to sell now, I couldn't put more money in and wait to see if it improved. Know when to let go of a dream when it can't be done. And if you do lose money, remember that education is not free. Learn from the experience.

4. Once you've recognized your unhappiness and concluded it's not going to go away or you realize you can't go on financially, physically or for whatever reason, ask what it is you want to do next. Research it, find out all you can. Will it support you is only one of many questions that need to be answered. Another one is whether you will be happy as a self-employed person with no financial security or would you prefer the more confining but more financially secure role of employee.

5. Possibly the biggest question anyone who is thinking of going out on their own should ask and answer is, "How much is enough?" Meaning how much money do you need to pay for your business expenses and dreams and your personal expenses and dreams, now and in the future. How you answer this will determine how big your company needs to be, how fast it needs to grow, how many employees if any you may need, etc.

6. Gather as much advice from whomever you can, but realize that in the end, you must make the ultimate decision about whatever it is you want to do, no one else can.

7. No business or job is without stress of one kind or another, at least some of the time. Financial concerns, the client from hell, working versus family...there are many. If it's something you really want to do, realize there will always be stress to deal with.

8. Whatever you are going to do, be passionate about it and realize that being your own boss means doing business 24/7/365. Get your family on-board as well, because much of the time, you will be doing business and you won't be taking vacations. For me, if I'm not in session I'm marketing, attending association meetings, doing paperwork, worrying about the business, thinking about it, planning new equipment purchases, figuring out financing...whatever, it's always with you.

9. No matter how small your business is - mine is just me - it is a business and should be run like a business. If you're a creative type and shun the business aspects, don't. Force yourself to learn and understand the business side of whatever it is you do. Things like bank deposits, bill paying, invoicing, collections and balancing your bank account should not be alien entities. It's very difficult to be successful if you don't know where the money is coming from, where it's going or how much there is.

10. You must market your business on a regular basis. With the exception of word-of-mouth, which you can't buy, no one will know about you and your business if you don't tell them about it. Put up a website, email and letter market, use flyers, join associations, try any and all avenues of marketing. Monitor what works and what doesn't and keep using the ones that do. And don't market in small amounts. It's a numbers game. If you send out 100 emails or letters, be extremely happy if you get 5 replies. Not actual business, just replies. Do have patience. Marketing efforts don't pay off immediately, they take time, usually many months.

11. If possible, start your business off as a part-time endeavour that you can do after hours and on weekends. This lets you slowly build the business up, get the gear you need, test the waters without giving up the full-time job safety net and ultimately lets you discover if indeed this is really what you want to do.

12. In the end, as part-time or just jumping in full-time, do it if you really want to because you'll never know for sure if it's what you want to do unless you actually do it. When I left a full-time marketing rep job with company car and expense account to try my hand at radio, like Cliff, I was fortunate because I had no wife, kids or mortgage to factor into the decision. The way I looked at it was I would rather try it and possibly fail than look back in later years and wonder what it would have been like. No matter what you try and what the outcome is, never regret it. You may fail, you may be embarrassed, you may lose money...it doesn't matter. You did something you wanted to do and that you should never regret.

Cheers,
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  #18  
Old 02-13-2004, 04:34 PM
Greenshoe Greenshoe is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

Silence,

As you can see, you're not alone here. There was a recent survey done (read it on MSNBC) that talked about job dissatisfaction in the US at an all time high - more than 70% were unhappy with their jobs for many reasons - longer hours to cover for the jobs of the recently laid off, stagnant pay with rising cost of living, long commute times, blurring of work vs. home resulting from email, etc. etc.

It's interesting that you posted this today, as this is something I've been going through with work and today, it is starting to come to a head and due for a clean break.

I've been playing music all my life, loved to write, and was always involved in something artistic. Then I went to college, studied economics, worked on Wall Street, went back to business school, and still working at a finance/legal-related job (though an animation studio is a more creative place) - all because that's what is 'practical' and what is defined as 'successful'. I've had some pretty amazing life experiences, but it wasn't because (in fact, it was in spite of) these choices I made in my education and career to date. Anyhow, I've been working on my own material for the past two years, enough for a full-length CD (a 'vanity pressing' so to speak; it's a start) and in the beginnings of trying to market the material. After recently taking acting training for kicks, I caught the acting bug as well after having been in my first production as an adult. I'm going to be pursuing both acting and writing seriously (i.e. as full-time as I can afford to NOT work), and it is scaring me sh**less. I'm doing this not because I want to, but because I feel I have to. It's like something I need to do before I die.

So hang in there, I'm more likely off the deep end more than you are, and I'm supposed to be a well grounded guy! I've always believed that like a yin and yang, you can't expect to have fulfillment in anything without enduring the struggles to get there. In other words, the most rewarding and fulfilling things in your life are often the ones that will require you to endure the most struggle to get there. And anyways no matter what happens, you'll be a stronger human being for having lived through it.
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  #19  
Old 02-13-2004, 10:05 PM
Joe Evans Joe Evans is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

SoS,

This isn't exactly the same, but it might give you some insight.....

I have been a paramedic for almost 19 years this year. I work 24 on 48 off and teach scuba diving on my off days. A few years ago, I got just about as burned out as anyone could be on a job, took a leave of absence and moved to Bimini to teach scuba full time. I lived there for about a year and over time realized that I couldn't do that for the rest of my life. I had a blast, got a killer tan, made alot of friends and some great memories but it wasn't my calling if you know what I mean. I am back working the streets as a medic again and am about 100% happier knowing that I gave my dreams a chance and it was my choice to come back.

My point is this....you will never know if you are doing the right thing until you just stop what you are doing and give your dreams a shot. I agree with Bruce that you need to make sure not to burn any bridges and keep your options open, but until you jump out there and do it, you will never know if that is what you need to be happy.

I hope this isn't too far off the mark to make some sense to you. Good luck dude!
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  #20  
Old 02-14-2004, 03:06 AM
6969 6969 is offline
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Default Re: When is it time to quit?

You could be like me.A waiter at 37.Livin paycheck to paycheck.The possibilities of NEVER owning a home loom large.Have to attempt to come up with $$$ to pay for health care real soon.BUT,a dedicated artist for life in the big city of L.A.,tryin to start a DJ biz,tryin to make music,tryin to get acting work.I guess its all about balance.My waiter job allows me to pursue my artistry like a rabid dog.I take the financial sacrifice because time is what I need to create successes.Its not about becoming wealthy .Its about doing the best you can to get to where you wanna be whatever it takes.It sounds like your sacrifice is this job you hate but it seems like its allowing you to get to where you want to be.Patience grasshopper.

P.S.If you got someone to love when you get home you are recieving the biggest payoff life will offer

DJ
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