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  #1  
Old 08-30-2006, 01:14 AM
Taddy Taddy is offline
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Default Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcast

Hi Everyone,

I've just received some work to mix a childrens show for DVD that may go to air. I normally mix for broadcast (for Australia) keeping all peaks at -10. If I do the same for a DVD, it's going to be way lower than the competition.

Is there some sort of standard for mixing to DVD like there is with most broadcasters?

Should I provide 2 mixes, one mixed with peaks to -10 and the other with peaks to say -3?

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 08-30-2006, 06:20 AM
georgia georgia is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcast

When I do DVD's I use more of a film level.. 0 dbfs for peak, but I keep the amb and reallly quiet stuff a little higher than the theatrical version due to typical home noise floor. I also watch the really quiet dialogue levels for the same reasons. (basically a tighter dynamix range) Another way I've had success is use the broadcast mix (and its associated tighter dynamic range) by increasing the gain of the final mix itself 6 db higher... ( normally I never get to do a "special" DVD mix because nobody wants to spend the money or the time for 3 different mixes )

I really hate when I play a DVD at my sister's house ( a typical cheap consumer 5.1 set up ) and I can't hear the quiet dialogue so I turn up the volume and seconds later I'm thorwing myself to the ground when an explosion occurs in the mix and whats left of the 5 tweeters from her system are now danegerous projectiles....



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Old 08-30-2006, 09:49 AM
Rick Sanchez Rick Sanchez is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcas

One thing that may help is to find out who is going to be doing the audio encoding for the DVD and get their input. They have some leeway in determining levels. You can find a lot of good information on the Dolby web site about AC3 encoding and some of the level compensation tools.
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Old 08-30-2006, 02:12 PM
Taddy Taddy is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcast

So is that what everyone is doing? 0 dbfs for peaks for a DVD just like an audio CD?
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Old 08-31-2006, 07:25 AM
latvia latvia is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcas

Although levels may peak at 0, just like an audio CD, the average level of DVD is lower. If you mix a DVD just like you would a CD, you won't allow for any dynamic range (as the tendency nowadays is to slam audio CDs), and it would be... loud. Also, keep in mind that encoding may affect your work in a negative way.
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Old 08-31-2006, 08:56 AM
Charles D. Ballard Charles D. Ballard is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcas

Quote:
I really hate when I play a DVD at my sister's house ( a typical cheap consumer 5.1 set up ) and I can't hear the quiet dialogue so I turn up the volume and seconds later I'm thorwing myself to the ground when an explosion occurs in the mix and whats left of the 5 tweeters from her system are now danegerous projectiles....
LOL!
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Old 08-31-2006, 06:46 PM
pat yacono pat yacono is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcast

Also, mixing through the encode decode chain is pretty important if you have that luxury. I do not have that luxury in realtime, but I do work with the Neyrinck plugs which have really let me know how loud I can get or not. Full code just simply will not sound good through the encode/decode chain for consumer ac3, it gets squashed even if the dolby dynamic range compensation is off and with dialnorm at -31. Georgia's advice is spot on, approach like a film mix and shrink the dynamic range, especially with bg's louder. When you have a big thunderous section, make sure it is not getting squashed by the decoder, and also make sure the downmix of you 5.1's sum does not clip.
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Old 09-01-2006, 11:27 AM
Gatekeeper Gatekeeper is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcas

Quote:
I really hate when I play a DVD at my sister's house ( a typical cheap consumer 5.1 set up ) and I can't hear the quiet dialogue so I turn up the volume and seconds later I'm thorwing myself to the ground when an explosion occurs in the mix and whats left of the 5 tweeters from her system are now danegerous projectiles....
So very true. Even on my friends Mitsubishi 52 inch, which has a "decent" audio system in it, If I'm watching a movie later at night and don't want to offend the roomies, I'm constantly futzing with the remote so that I can hear quiet dialogue passages, only to be knocked off the couch by the gunfight/explosion/T-Rex in the next scene.
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  #9  
Old 09-05-2006, 12:02 AM
Taddy Taddy is offline
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Default Re: Mixing for DVD compared to mixing for Broadcas

Thanks Everyone,

I think I'll mix it with peaks up around -10. I really didn't like the idea of slamming every peak to 0. Any other thoughts on this let me know.
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