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  #21  
Old 04-03-2004, 09:50 AM
abluesky abluesky is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

Let me know if you have any problems or questions. Just send me an e-mail. pascal@abluesky.com

Cheers!
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  #22  
Old 04-03-2004, 12:56 PM
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dr sound dr sound is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

Dan,
Weren't you over on the "Radford Lot" mixing a Feature recently? Are you trying to see how the music translates to the Stage? Keeping in mind the final location (Theatrical, TV, DVD etc) will determine your calibration. If you’re mixing for Features it's 85 c weighted slow. Follow the Dolby guidelines. If your mixing for TV it's typically 79-82spl.Did you contact your Music Mixer and see how/if he calibrated his system? If your still in doubt contact your Re-Recording Mixer at the Stage and have him get you in touch with the Chief Engineer of the facility. He will be able to set you straight.
Take Care,
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  #23  
Old 04-03-2004, 06:37 PM
Christian Dolan Christian Dolan is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

Dan,

AFAIK, you use 82 db SPL for a mono surround track (i.e. Dolby Stereo LCRS). In that case, when the channels sum up acoustically, 82+82=85, but only for theatrical mixes. LCRS mixes for TV and DVD use 85 dB for the surrounds. 85 is also used for 5.1 (discrete surround) mixes, theatrical or otherwise.

At least, that's what I think it is. There are a lot of folks on this board who know more than I, so, as always, take the info with a grain of salt and double-check it.

Hope this helps.
-Christian

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  #24  
Old 04-03-2004, 07:40 PM
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dr sound dr sound is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

Quote:
Having seen this question asked nearly weekly, I have decided to post a few reference sites that can be used to calibrate your room for post.
First purchase a Radio Shack SPL meter # 330-2050(Analog). Then follow these links:
http://www.dolby.com/tech/L.mn.0002.5.1Guide.s.pdf
Go to Chapter 3 and read the whole chapter. When finished read all the rest of the chapters.

Christian,
Go to page 34 in the Dolby link above. Read it and it spells it out for all of you.
That is the reason I put it up there so there would be no doubt on what the levels need to be.

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  #25  
Old 04-05-2004, 07:13 PM
Dan Pinder Dan Pinder is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

Quote:
Dan,

AFAIK, you use 82 db SPL for a mono surround track (i.e. Dolby Stereo LCRS). In that case, when the channels sum up acoustically, 82+82=85, but only for theatrical mixes. LCRS mixes for TV and DVD use 85 dB for the surrounds. 85 is also used for 5.1 (discrete surround) mixes, theatrical or otherwise.

At least, that's what I think it is. There are a lot of folks on this board who know more than I, so, as always, take the info with a grain of salt and double-check it.

Hope this helps.
-Christian


Thanks, I'm doing my best to get my head around the Dolby spec (in general) and Pascal from Blue Sky was very helpful in sorting out some questions.

Quote:
Dan,
Weren't you over on the "Radford Lot" mixing a Feature recently? Are you trying to see how the music translates to the Stage? Keeping in mind the final location (Theatrical, TV, DVD etc) will determine your calibration. If you’re mixing for Features it's 85 c weighted slow. Follow the Dolby guidelines. If your mixing for TV it's typically 79-82spl.Did you contact your Music Mixer and see how/if he calibrated his system? If your still in doubt contact your Re-Recording Mixer at the Stage and have him get you in touch with the Chief Engineer of the facility. He will be able to set you straight.
Take Care,

Yes, that was me. We just finished last week so I will call Steve B over there and ask how they cal their surrounds. I enjoyed that room very much (spacious!) and the mixers are awesome. I AM trying to see how music translates to stage, though it will benefit temp music as much as the actual score mix stems. Also, I cut some musical effects in quad format for the final but had to do it on stage on headphones, so I didn't really know if it was going to work until the next day when the music mixer let me play it back. That really hit home for me the importance of being able to monitor in 5.1 with accuracy.

Thanks to everybody for their valued input.
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  #26  
Old 04-05-2004, 09:13 PM
Christian Dolan Christian Dolan is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

Quote:
Go to page 34 in the Dolby link above. Read it and it spells it out for all of you.
That is the reason I put it up there so there would be no doubt on what the levels need to be.


D'oh! Should've double-checked it myself before I posted. Thanks for catching that.
-Christian
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  #27  
Old 04-21-2004, 11:53 AM
Fritz Fritz is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

man that's handy.. thanks very!
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  #28  
Old 04-25-2004, 03:58 PM
tomcat tomcat is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

just wanted to relay a success story. I designed a TINY mix room for my friend's post shop last summer. It is small and we had to do a tremendous amount of bass absorbtion treatment. There is a lot to the story, but i will keep to the point here. After much research and implementation the room was finished and i tweaked it using a rented spectrum analyzer, a radioshack spl meter and the blue-sky test tones.

A few weeks ago, we had our first film mix that was definately going to go to theatres. A VERY interesting film, btw: Todd Solandz's "Palindromes" We mixed for 11 days in the little room then went for a day to sound one in NY to make a dolby digital printmaster from my stems.

I was thrilled to see that Riley Steele, the mixer in charge of the printmastering session did not touch a fader, panner, trim or anything. The mix sounded almost exactly the same in big studio F at sound one as it did in the super small mix room.

Thanks to Marty and all the contributors to this and other forums. This stuff really does work!

Cheers,
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  #29  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:32 PM
jarvis-10264 jarvis-10264 is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post



Hey there Doc,

Been reading about you alot. Just a couple of query, how do I read more about those beautiful TDM for surrounds? What are the essentials while doing audio post with video under the NTSC system? Thanks Doc, we all knows you have the answer


jvrs
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  #30  
Old 05-04-2004, 09:26 AM
nikki-k nikki-k is offline
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Default Re: Room Calibration for Film and TV Post

Hi!
Just did the leap to 5.1 in my home studio last week (still need to do RTA, waiting for mic).
Opted for the Blue Sky System One 5.1.

I was using Event 20/20Bas + Event 20/20/15. Even without doing any RTA based setup yet (just a quick SPL meter calibration), the difference is night and day. I was amazed at the difference.

Also- Kudos x 10 to Blue Sky!!! When I received my System One 5.1, two of the Sats were the Sat 5's. Called late in the day to verify that I was correct that I was sent the wrong Sats, since the boxes said "Sat 5," but had stickers including as part of my specfic order. All were gone but the receptionist, but she gave me the VP's number, who returned my call within minutes. The next day, got a call to collect info, and the correct Sat 6.5's were in my hands 2 days later!
Blue Sky has been more than helpful, and their customer service has proven to be just as great as the products they offer. Extremely happy is an understatement!

Dr Sound- thx for this thread! Really should be a sticky. I was able to collect 90% of the info presented from multiple sources, but it took me several hours to get all the info from searching around, and trial and error of exactly which "search terms" to use to locate all the info, scouring a few forums in the process.

Quick question: When determining room modes, should one round measurements of the room to nearest foot, or translate inches to percentage (to provide a base-10 number right of decimal)? My room is 11' 10" x 19' 4" x 7' 10". Due to circumstances, I am forced to place/ face on long wall, shooting short, front monitors about 2' off wall, approx 3' equilateral formed from mix position for L/R Front. Ceiling is under 8' due to wood (Pergo type) floor.

I have also recently heard that a Pergo type wood floor is not a great idea, since it is not "real wood," and actually could present certainproblems due to it's properties. True? Better with something like a commercial grade carpet? "Real wood" is not an option at this time.

Lastly, for bass traps: I have been using Auralex, but after much reading, finding that the deisgn/application intention actually comes short of providing what I should need, due to room size. RealTraps look nice, but are there other options?

Thx!
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