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  #1  
Old 04-17-2006, 09:49 AM
mastermorris mastermorris is offline
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Location: Atlanta, GA
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Default Metal drum sounds

I am in the process of recording a 6 song demo for a metal artist in which I'm using a sesh drummer. I am using the following equipment:

Kick: Beta 52
Snare: Sm57
Toms: Audix
Overheads: Rhodes

I running the mics to an ADA 8000 light pipe connector using ADAT inputs and running the overheads through a Mackie 1604. I need to get a metal drum sound and need the advice from all the professionals. I know EQ, Compression, etc. is a must but getting the correct settings is the problem. I thank everyone for their feedback.

RM
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  #2  
Old 04-17-2006, 10:37 AM
Naagzh Naagzh is offline
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Default Re: Metal drum sounds

You are running ALL the drum mics through some sort of mic pre, right? You mentioned the overheads going to the Mackie (ugh), but are the other drum mics going to mic pres before the ADA8000? If you don't own enough mic pres, rent some.

Most, if not all, current death-metal drum sounds are a combination of the recorded kit and kick, snare, and/or tom samples. You might try recording some cool kick and snare samples off of a drum machine, or purchasing a plugin like DFH or Drumagog, and using that to sneak in the sample underneath the corresponding recorded drum.

If you don't want to go the sampling route, then you might want the drummer to play wooden beaters on the bass drum, and maybe tape quarters to the bass drum batter head so the beater hits them (to get that thwack sound; I think Vinnie Paul from Pantera used to do that). Also, try to make a sheild for the hi-hat bleed into the snare mic, as this will allow you to compress the crap out of the snare while keeping the bleed in check.

Also, read up on parallel compression. This is what makes it punch. You NEED to learn this!

Compression settings change by the song, the tempo, the mood, etc., so it's silly to give you settings, and to think that there is such a thing as "correct". However, it is important that you understand how compression can change a signal. For example, a longer, more legato bass drum sound can be had with slow attack and a slow release. Also, the attack of the snare can be quelled by a short attack and quick release. You might try that one on the overheads, because chances are good that you're already getting plenty of attack from the snare mic. If you're compressor is pumping (and you don't want it to) you can use a side-chain EQ in order to have the compressor ignore the lower, pump-inducing frequencies and act according to the mid and high range dynamics. Suffice it to say that there's alot to learn.

Actually, the best learning tool you could have is free: the Digi Comp/Dyn III plug-in. It's presets are very straightforward and effective, and you can just note the settings as you try things out. Use the presets as a starting point, and tweak from there.

You'll probably want a stereo aux track for reverb, esp. since you don't mention any room or ambient micing. I'd start with a Room 2 setting on D-Verb (100% Wet), and send the overheads to it gently to see how it sounds. Maybe send the snare and toms, but probably not, since metal bands usu. want a tight drum sound. Treat the reverb track as another drum track. Using an EQ, you could roll off the high end if it sounds too harsh (maybe there's a built-in LPF for this).

That's all I can think of for now. Have fun!
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  #3  
Old 04-17-2006, 12:08 PM
chrisk23 chrisk23 is offline
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Default Re: Metal drum sounds

one of the most effective tools for recording drums i've had experience with is the Transient Designer by SPL (outboard though)

http://www.spl-usa.com/Transient_Designer/in_short.html

Waves has a plug-in called TransX, & Sony Oxford has one called Transient Modulator, that do similar things as the SPL
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  #4  
Old 04-17-2006, 01:14 PM
mastermorris mastermorris is offline
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Default Re: Metal drum sounds

I really appreciate the feedback. You have me a lot of great tips.
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  #5  
Old 04-17-2006, 01:15 PM
mastermorris mastermorris is offline
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Default Re: Metal drum sounds

So, what does the transient designer actually do?
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  #6  
Old 04-17-2006, 01:40 PM
chrisk23 chrisk23 is offline
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Default Re: Metal drum sounds

kinda hard to explain (or rather much too easy to explain)--the transient designer shapes the attack & sustain behaviour of a sound source--but it is not processed by by signal level (such as compressors), but rather by the dynamic envelope--transient designers work best with sharp transients (Any of the non-sustaining, non-periodic frequency components of a sound, usually of brief duration and higher amplitude than the sustaining components, and occurring near the onset of the sound) such as percusion.

thats the definition--but like compression--it's something you'd have to hear for yourself--the SPL machine is truly amazing though--it makes weak recordings much stronger, makes rubbery toms tighten up, also make the transient balance between snare & bass drum more even--i've gone as far as to put cheap drum machines through the SPL, and have killer pro-grade loops come out. if you can get to a dealer (which can be found on thier web site)--try one out (SPL makes a 4-ch & a 2-ch)--if you record drums, this is you secret weapon
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  #7  
Old 04-19-2006, 06:41 AM
mastermorris mastermorris is offline
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Default Re: Metal drum sounds

I checked this out on line and it looks like a "must" in the studio. I just called guitar center and they gave me a price of $1,299.00 for the unit! EXPENSIVE!!! Do you know if there is a software program that basically does the same thing as this outboard piece of equipment? I appreicate all the feedback and education on recording drums.
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  #8  
Old 05-12-2006, 11:06 AM
2012 2012 is offline
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Default Re: Metal drum sounds

Metal = Andy Sneap

go to andysneap.com and check out the forum. he shares his knowledge & techniques. he's even put up his own samples for people to use in their productions. his forum is ALL metal, ALL the time.
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