Avid Pro Audio Community

Avid Pro Audio Community (http://duc.avid.com/index.php)
-   003, Mbox 2, Digi 002, original Mbox, Digi 001 (Mac) (http://duc.avid.com/forumdisplay.php?f=15)
-   -   Identifying Frequencies (http://duc.avid.com/showthread.php?t=172515)

ScottFB 07-17-2006 05:35 PM

Identifying Frequencies
 
Hi,
I was just wondering if anyone knew of a really good source of material that would help in identifying frequencies for use during the EQ process.....websites.....charts....reading material....DVDs....etc
I'm currently enrolled in an online Mixing & Mastering In Pro Tools course offered thru Berklee and am feeling kind of lost on this very important aspect of things....other than just doing a lot of guess work!!!!

Thanks,
Scott

M.Brane 07-17-2006 08:19 PM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
There are some note=freq charts floating around the 'net. I like to keep one handy for calculating low frequency signal generator trickery.

I don't get too deep into analyzing EQ though. I pretty much just twist the knobs until it sounds good, but then I'm a hack.

I'm sure you could train your ears to recognize frequencies just like notes. Like learning to play an instrument it just takes time, and practice. Playing around with the signal generator could be a good place to start as well as learning the fundamental, and harmonic range of different instruments.

kelsey 07-17-2006 09:42 PM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
A great way to isolate frequencies for eq'ing is to set a single band on your eq with a VERY narrow q, then boost(or cut, but boosting is more obvious sounding) that band all the way. Then sweep your frequency from left to right, and certian frequency's will stand out like a sore thumb. Turn down your monitors, or this track a notch or two before doing this, as boosting a band on the eq all the way up will add quite a bit of volume to it. Once you've identified the problem(or sweet) frequency that you want, leave it there, reset the gain of that band to 0, set your q, and start eq'ing till you achieve the sound you want.

Hope that helps.

3D

mindnoise 07-18-2006 01:14 AM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
Hi,

for webcharts of freq´s (and much more) check this one:
http://www.theprojectstudiohandbook.com/directory.htm

for spectrum analysis check this:
http://www.sonoria.pl/jk/pluggox.html

the technique with EQ sweeping, described above is well known and proofed.
But I suggest reducing your Speaker volume much more drastically, better safe than sorry.


regs

req06 07-18-2006 07:22 AM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
bob katz' book "mastering audio" has a really good chart which has all instruments' notes and frequencies in it...well worth buying anyway and will give a large insight into preparing a mix for mastering.

accession 07-18-2006 08:09 AM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
Quote:

Hi,
I was just wondering if anyone knew of a really good source of material that would help in identifying frequencies for use during the EQ process.....websites.....charts....reading material....DVDs....etc
I'm currently enrolled in an online Mixing & Mastering In Pro Tools course offered thru Berklee and am feeling kind of lost on this very important aspect of things....other than just doing a lot of guess work!!!!

Thanks,
Scott

Just wondering how you'd use the information.

Firstly, instruments play a range of notes, scales, octaves, so nothing will be tied to one frequency (remember that every octave is doubling/halving the frequency)

Secondly, unless you're listening to pure sine tones, every sound is a fundamental tone with numerous higher frequencies (harmonics) combined.

TVPostSound 07-18-2006 08:15 AM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
Look for books or DVDs , do a web search with the words/term "Relative Pitch" in them.

Then you can learn about Absolute Pitch, then Perfect Pitch!!!!

M.Brane 07-18-2006 06:24 PM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
Quote:

unless you're listening to pure sine tones, every sound is a fundamental tone with numerous higher frequencies (harmonics) combined.

This is an excellent point.

What makes an instrument sound the way it does is the harmonic structure not the fundamental.

Many low-freq instruments will actually fit much better into a dense mix if you high-pass above the fundamental. The human ear has an amazing way of filling in the blanks.

Likewise for high-pitched instruments. Low-passing the extreme highs can add "warmth" to certain instruments that tend to sound brittle with full bandwidth.

It all depends on the overall context though. Everything affects everything.

ScottFB 07-18-2006 09:00 PM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
Thanks everyone for your input & suggestions!
I guess I should have worded my initial post with less neophyte ignorance.........what I was actually looking for were some resources(i.e. EQ'ing For Dummies!) that would help with identifying which particular frequency ranges to 'focus' on for particular instruments during the EQ'ing process....obviously I don't need to be wasting time at 60hz when toying with a hi-hat track......thanks to the responses here I was able to view some charts that listed the info I had in mind........some general rules and some individual instrument frequency ranges to boost or cut that usually make a big difference in the mix process!

-Scott

M.Brane 07-18-2006 09:13 PM

Re: Identifying Frequencies
 
Quote:

obviously I don't need to be wasting time at 60hz when toying with a hi-hat track......

Probably not, but never say never. It's amazing what mics pick up sometimes.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:22 AM.

Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2008, Jelsoft Enterprises Limited. Forum Hosted By: URLJet.com