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-   -   If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems? (http://duc.avid.com/showthread.php?t=394692)

Rockman413 10-27-2017 05:03 AM

If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Hi there,
Just wondering if I use a crap/old/ may have hit/ may have bad clusters/may have bad blocks hard drive to copy pro tools session/ audio files to another computer, will the receiver got affected/damaged audio files?

Is it as long as we can read/copy out from the crapped hard drive, then it's fine?
I have used an USB stick to copy audio files and I occasionally found 1 audio file got affected/damaged, half of that audio file turns into white noise... Not sure if it's the same with hard drive

Horns-Up 10-27-2017 05:24 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
If the disk is old but fully functional, then go for it...
BUT
If you know that the disk may have bad sectors, do yourself a favor and throw it away. Disks are so cheap these days that it's not worth it to have your data (any data) corrupted.
You can get a 2 TB disk for about $60 on Amazon... put it in some USB enclosure and there you have your disk to transfer your sessions from one location to another.

Rockman413 10-27-2017 05:50 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Horns-Up (Post 2456453)
If the disk is old but fully functional, then go for it...
BUT
If you know that the disk may have bad sectors, do yourself a favor and throw it away. Disks are so cheap these days that it's not worth it to have your data (any data) corrupted.
You can get a 2 TB disk for about $60 on Amazon... put it in some USB enclosure and there you have your disk to transfer your sessions from one location to another.

How about SSD? Would a old/may have hit SSD cause any corruption?

Rockman413 10-27-2017 05:55 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Horns-Up (Post 2456453)
If the disk is old but fully functional, then go for it...
BUT
If you know that the disk may have bad sectors, do yourself a favor and throw it away. Disks are so cheap these days that it's not worth it to have your data (any data) corrupted.
You can get a 2 TB disk for about $60 on Amazon... put it in some USB enclosure and there you have your disk to transfer your sessions from one location to another.

What's the best HD check soft? So maybe we can check if we suspect a HD

Horns-Up 10-27-2017 06:23 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456458)
How about SSD? Would a old/may have hit SSD cause any corruption?

I got my first SSD back in 2008-2009 and it is still working perfectly fine.
I've been using it for different purpose over the years and it's quite possible that is has some bad sectors...(never checked it)

SSDs work a bit different than regular HDDs...
SSD can totally tolerate bad sectors because the firmware of the SSD keeps track of all bad sectors and will never write any data to those sectors.

If you are on windows you can use chkdsk or Disk Utility on Mac.

Rockman413 10-27-2017 07:22 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Horns-Up (Post 2456466)
I got my first SSD back in 2008-2009 and it is still working perfectly fine.
I've been using it for different purpose over the years and it's quite possible that is has some bad sectors...(never checked it)

SSDs work a bit different than regular HDDs...
SSD can totally tolerate bad sectors because the firmware of the SSD keeps track of all bad sectors and will never write any data to those sectors.

If you are on windows you can use chkdsk or Disk Utility on Mac.

meaning, if it has been written already, then a already-written sector turns bad, it will not be readable? Or it will still be readable, but you're going to get incomplete info/ corrupted audio?

JoelG 10-27-2017 07:32 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Short answer, do yourself a favour and don't use a drive that has known bad sectors.

You can use a program to check the SMART attributes of a drive: https://www.passmark.com/products/diskcheckup.htm or run a full scandisk.

Joel

Rockman413 10-27-2017 08:42 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JoelG (Post 2456479)
Short answer, do yourself a favour and don't use a drive that has known bad sectors.

You can use a program to check the SMART attributes of a drive: https://www.passmark.com/products/diskcheckup.htm or run a full scandisk.

Joel

Is there a mac soft to check this?

john1192 10-27-2017 09:02 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
here is a search for what you need .. Apple Disk Utility is one and then below that are others ...

https://www.google.com/search?client...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Rockman413 10-27-2017 09:20 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
I'm not asking how HDD or SSD manages sectors.

My questions are:
1. If an HDD/SSD have bad sectors, I use it to transfer files to my other computer, will my other computer get any corrupted files?
Or
As long as my other computer can read/copy the files without any errors, then I can fully trust all copied files are non-corrupted ?

2. If I write files to a good HDD/SSD, and later it got hit the ground/got damaged and may have new or even a lot of bad sectors- meaning my previously written files are now on bad sectors. So I copy them out to my other computer, am I going to get corrupted files? or as long as I can copy them out without any error, all files are exactly the same as the original fils?

Darryl Ramm 10-27-2017 09:49 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
To the original issue/cause here. If you suspect the USB stick put it aside or throw it out. Check that the problem is not something you are doing wrong, e.g. copying files while Pro Tools or another application might still be writing the files. Not properly unmounting a USB stick before removing it from a computer likely causes most corruption with those devices.

NTFS on Windows and HFS+ on Mac (and in future APFS will be even better) are more robust filesystems than FAT32 or EXFAT. Archive backup volumes should be on NFTS or HFS+ (APFS in future) not EXFAT or FAT32. EXFAT can be a handy filesystem to use on a USB transfer stick, but don't rely on that a backup.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456603)
I'm not asking how HDD or SSD manages sectors.

My questions are:
1. If an HDD/SSD have bad sectors, I use it to transfer files to my other computer, will my other computer get any corrupted files?

Or

As long as my other computer can read/copy the files without any errors, then I can fully trust all copied files are non-corrupted ?

No. and Yes. As far as anybody here needs to worry about, the file will either succeed or fail to transfer.

There is a much much rarer concern in computer systems storage design about exotic forms of silent data corruption. Not something to worry here.

Quote:

2. If I write files to a good HDD/SSD, and later it got hit the ground/got damaged and may have new or even a lot of bad sectors- meaning my previously written files are now on bad sectors. So I copy them out to my other computer, am I going to get corrupted files? or as long as I can copy them out without any error, all files are exactly the same as the original fils?
Worse case the whole drive might be unreadable and unrecoverable, or whole partitions/filesystems may be unreadable (and others on the drive are), or individual blocks within files data can't be read or it takes multiple retires (transparently to you) for the disk to read them. If a file read fails often applications will crash or a copy program will report an error.

Your primary protection against data loss is having backups.

SSDs might complicate the discussion because they are much more complex to understand internally that a HDD. But to the end-user they operate similarly. Good quality SSDs should have higher-reliability than HDD when used for active storage, for offline/archive storage you want to use a HDD. Don't put backups or archives in SSDs they are not intended for long-term powered off storage, but that is an active area of R&D.

For a HDD or SSD if SMART is reporting errors throw it out. Nobody here should really be worrying about deeper details of how drives work. What you should be worrying about is you backup and recovery plan, what failures you are protecting against (disk drive failure, building failure (e.g. fire, earthquake), theft, etc.) and testing both the backups and recovery actually work. You likely should be using different methods to backup boot/system drives and to make archives of sessions. And think about how far you want to be able to roll back either of those. And don't have just one active backup, the classic time for things to go South is when you are trying to write the backup and the read of the parent disk fails, now you have a failing disk and a possibly half-overwritten useless backup. Ad similar for archives, if something is missing it might also be missing.

And the most common cause of data loss is *not* disk failure, its the idiot user. So you want to think though what happens if you accidentally delete lots of audio content out of some sessions. And don't notice for weeks, has your backup plan overwritten all those useful old backups with the later now useless new session folder by the time you notice? etc.

You need multiple separate backups, ideally some stored off-site and/or in the cloud, and on different types of media. NAS systems can be fantastic as one of the things to archiving to (but don't rely on having all eggs in one basket).

QuikDraw 10-27-2017 09:58 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456603)
I'm not asking how HDD or SSD manages sectors.

My questions are:
1. If an HDD/SSD have bad sectors, I use it to transfer files to my other computer, will my other computer get any corrupted files?

Any file that spans bad sectors will most likely not transfer at all. The disk/OS may try several times before giving up and reporting that the file is unreadable. The target disk will not "inherit" any bad sectors.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456603)
Or
As long as my other computer can read/copy the files without any errors, then I can fully trust all copied files are non-corrupted ?

If your computer can read/copy without errors then you won't have errors.
Can you "fully trust" all copied files are non-corrupted? No. Even with brand new drives files can be corrupted.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456603)
2. If I write files to a good HDD/SSD, and later it got hit the ground/got damaged and may have new or even a lot of bad sectors- meaning my previously written files are now on bad sectors. So I copy them out to my other computer, am I going to get corrupted files? or as long as I can copy them out without any error, all files are exactly the same as the original fils?

If the files can be read without error then the copies will not have errors.

Just try it, and see what you get. If you end up with a few corrupted files then you might try a data recovery service if the files are valuable to you.

Rockman413 10-28-2017 05:03 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Thank you both for the detailed explain.

So , can I understand it in this way:

As long as I have copied data from a HDD/SSD to my mac without seeing any error messages, or as long as the copy/read is complete, I can trust I have got all the files and nothing is corrupted. Correct?

Of course, if my target computer drive is corrupted, but I have also complete the copying from it to another new target drive and if the copy is complete without any system error messages , then I can trust all the data is non-corrupted, Correct?

JFreak 10-28-2017 05:24 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Darryl Ramm (Post 2456605)
the most common cause of data loss is *not* disk failure, its the idiot user

This made my day :D :D :D

Darryl Ramm 10-28-2017 08:32 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JFreak (Post 2456632)
This made my day :D :D :D



It is supposed to make you do a backup.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

albee1952 10-28-2017 10:08 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Indeed...feel free to use a drive that is questionable, IF(the great big IF) you adhere to the axiom(thanks to Craig Anderton)"if it doesn't exist in at least 3 places, its not backed up);) SSD's are pretty darn solid, but spinners.....here's what happened to me just last week: Copying files from one system to another and it just stopped mid-stream. After a few minutes of restarts and head scratching, I notice a ticking noise. Yep, 1 500GB WD drive that had been sitting in a drawer for several months decided to quit for no reason I could figure. Then the next day, I am moving stuff in my office and snag a wire behind the desk as I am moving the phone and I hear a loud bang. It was an external drive that was sitting on top of a 6' cabinet(all my modem/router/network stuff sits up there). A 6' drop will kill a spinner.........:eek::eek::eek:

Extreme Mixing 10-28-2017 10:30 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
A six foot drop would hurt you, too!!!

Steve

Rockman413 10-28-2017 06:59 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by QuikDraw (Post 2456608)
Any file that spans bad sectors will most likely not transfer at all. The disk/OS may try several times before giving up and reporting that the file is unreadable. The target disk will not "inherit" any bad sectors.


If your computer can read/copy without errors then you won't have errors.
Can you "fully trust" all copied files are non-corrupted? No. Even with brand new drives files can be corrupted.

--->If my target computer/drive completes copying without errors, then can I trust all copied files are same as original and non-corrupted? Of course if the target computer/drive have a lot of bad sectors the files can be corrupted, but I copy them to another new target drive and it completes the copying without any system error message, then I can trust that all the data is the same as original, unless the new target disk have bad sectors to damage the datas... correct?

meaning, is there any possibility that I copy audio files from my computer to a target computer drive(which has no bad sectors) using a questionable drive , though I didn't get any system copy-error messages, but the data/audio files on the target computer drive can be corrupted because of the questionable drive which is used to transfer the audio files?

SigFriedChicken 10-28-2017 07:47 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456721)
--->If my target computer/drive completes copying without errors, then can I trust all copied files are same as original and non-corrupted? Of course if the target computer/drive have a lot of bad sectors the files can be corrupted, but I copy them to another new target drive and it completes the copying without any system error message, then I can trust that all the data is the same as original, unless the new target disk have bad sectors to damage the datas... correct?

meaning, is there any possibility that I copy audio files from my computer to a target computer drive(which has no bad sectors) using a questionable drive , though I didn't get any system copy-error messages, but the data/audio files on the target computer drive can be corrupted because of the questionable drive which is used to transfer the audio files?

This is a simple-seeming question, but it really depends on the specifics.

When you copy files, validation is usually handled by the operating system. I don't believe that operating systems generally perform a full "verify" operation when you copy a file, though they probably compare metadata, like file size, to confirm that the source and target are the same size. Generally, if no error is reported, you can be confident that the file is not corrupt. But "not corrupt" is not the same thing as "exactly the same as the source."

There are specialized copying and backup applications that will perform a full "verify" operation, where the source and target are compared, block by block, to ensure that they are exactly the same. Full verify operations are time-consuming and often take just as long as the actual copy operation. An alternative is to manually generate a checksum for a file, before it is copied, and then get a checksum for the file after it is copied and confirm that they match.

Rockman413 10-28-2017 08:56 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
So in realistic daily use:

even though I used a questionable HDD/SSD to copy the audio files, if I didn't get any error message when copying, then I should not worry about I may got corrupted audio files and I can trust all the audio files sounds exactly the same as the original audio files, correct?

Rockman413 10-28-2017 08:58 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SigFriedChicken (Post 2456726)
This is a simple-seeming question, but it really depends on the specifics.

When you copy files, validation is usually handled by the operating system. I don't believe that operating systems generally perform a full "verify" operation when you copy a file, though they probably compare metadata, like file size, to confirm that the source and target are the same size. Generally, if no error is reported, you can be confident that the file is not corrupt. But "not corrupt" is not the same thing as "exactly the same as the source."

There are specialized copying and backup applications that will perform a full "verify" operation, where the source and target are compared, block by block, to ensure that they are exactly the same. Full verify operations are time-consuming and often take just as long as the actual copy operation. An alternative is to manually generate a checksum for a file, before it is copied, and then get a checksum for the file after it is copied and confirm that they match.

Well you said it may not be the same as the source. So after of 50 hours of mixing and hard work, then we copy to another location, and we should suspect that's not exactly the same as what we have mixed?

Darryl Ramm 10-28-2017 09:55 PM

If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Oh God, why is this thread still going on. Just copy the files. If you had experiences where things did not seem to work then try to work out what happened. The most likely problems are mistakes like copying files not fully written to disk (e.g. Pro Tools session not closed before you copy), the disk not being properly unmoubted, or an application bug in Pro Tools.... silent filesystem or disk block level corruption are not worth worrying about. Deep corruption you expect copies to fail. But if you donít have confidence in a drive trash it.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Rockman413 10-29-2017 05:32 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Darryl Ramm (Post 2456732)
Oh God, why is this thread still going on. Just copy the files. If you had experiences where things did not seem to work then try to work out what happened. The most likely problems are mistakes like copying files not fully written to disk (e.g. Pro Tools session not closed before you copy), the disk not being properly unmoubted, or an application bug in Pro Tools.... silent filesystem or disk block level corruption are not worth worrying about. Deep corruption you expect copies to fail. But if you donít have confidence in a drive trash it.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The thing is, I just bought a new drive about 2 months ago , but it hit the floor , not a big deal thought but still some concerns. That's why I wonder if I continue use this one and if the copy process if complete without any errors, am I getting exactly the same audio files. That's why I start this topic to really understand how it works and if we can trust a complete copy process means we are getting the identical files.

Rockman413 10-29-2017 05:38 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Furthur more, I have had an experience of copying audio files to a very very cheap USB stick , and to another computer, and I got half of the audio turns into white noise... It may be damaged due to unmount...

So wondering if a super cheap USB stick, which may easily have bad blocks, once the copy is finished without any errors, can we really trust all the audio files are the same as original.

Darryl Ramm 10-29-2017 09:04 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456753)
Furthur more, I have had an experience of copying audio files to a very very cheap USB stick , and to another computer, and I got half of the audio turns into white noise... It may be damaged due to unmount...



So wondering if a super cheap USB stick, which may easily have bad blocks, once the copy is finished without any errors, can we really trust all the audio files are the same as original.


You are not helping yourself by having problems then leaping into a specific deeper area and asking things about like ďbad blocksĒ which have a specific technical meaning, are hardware related, below the level of files or the file system, and *will* cause reported errors on a file copy. Are you writing your own copy program? Filesystem? Working with a debugger trying to reconstruct a corrupt filesystem? No? Then stop asking questions about bad blocks etc. and start working out if you did anything that could cause this (much more likely), or you can work out if you have something like a corrupted filesystem or device (much less likely).

So again worry about things like...

Are you sure Pro Tools (or any other program/utility) fully exited/closed the session, with no errors reported, before you started copying files to the transfer media.

How exactly are you unmounting the transfer drive?

How exactly are you copying files?

There are three filesystems involved here, the source, transfer and target one. One each one compare the files, starting with generating a checksum for each file in the session. Where are they different?

What exact type of filesystem is on each device?

What exact OS/version is on each computer?

Is the file system you are copying from or too or on the transfer device corrupted. Run a file system check utility. What does it say/do?

Look at the SMART diagnostics (or equivalent) for each of the three devices.

Is this reproducible? How exactly?







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Rockman413 10-29-2017 08:21 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
meaning, when using even a questionable HDD or SSD, as long as I have copied the files out without seeing any error messages from OS X, then I can trust that the files I copied is the same/good as original and I should not worry. Correct?

Sardi 10-29-2017 09:26 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
You've gotten a lot of great info here from other posters, but I gotta ask, if you're really this paranoid about this particular drive in question, why not just buy another one? They're not exactly expensive these days.

Seems like it would put your mind at rest.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Rockman413 10-29-2017 09:32 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sardi (Post 2456915)
You've gotten a lot of great info here from other posters, but I gotta ask, if you're really this paranoid about this particular drive in question, why not just buy another one? They're not exactly expensive these days.

Seems like it would put your mind at rest.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I'm thinking , even copying from a bad drive, if I can copy them out without seeing any errors, then I don't have to worry about anything. So I don't want to buy another one, and I'll understand the theory so I don't have to worry in the future.

Darryl Ramm 10-29-2017 09:44 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456905)
meaning, when using even a questionable HDD or SSD, as long as I have copied the files out without seeing any error messages from OS X, then I can trust that the files I copied is the same/good as original and I should not worry. Correct?

Yes and no. Normally you are fine. There are possible very rare cases say where you can have problems. Like the file system begin written to has some form of rare corruption (but not bad block type issues that will cause an error of it can't be auto corrected).

And a very likely cause of data being wrong inside a file is not corruption of the filesystem of file, its the application program writing garbage into a perfectly fine file. So back up and go check every step here by checksumming the files at each stage and confirm where they differ. (not what any application. including Pro Tools tells you is in the file, but actually use a checksum to see the actual files on disk differ or not).

Again this should not be a hypothetical question. If you are having issues, work to find out what is actually going on and stop asking people what they think.

Rockman413 10-29-2017 10:00 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Darryl Ramm (Post 2456921)
Yes and no. Normally you are fine. There are possible very rare cases say where you can have problems. Like the file system begin written to has some form of rare corruption (but not bad block type issues that will cause an error of it can't be auto corrected).

And a very likely cause of data being wrong inside a file is not corruption of the filesystem of file, its the application program writing garbage into a perfectly fine file. So back up and go check every step here by checksumming the files at each stage and confirm where they differ. (not what any application. including Pro Tools tells you is in the file, but actually use a checksum to see the actual files on disk differ or not).

Again this should not be a hypothetical question. If you are having issues, work to find out what is actually going on and stop asking people what they think.

I have copied around 50 audio files(each file is one tracks) using a USB stick. I occasionally found 1 audio file has problem(half of that file turns into white noise) by ear human listening. Next time Iím going to copy 100 audio files, I want to know I can trust the copy, otherwise Iíll have to use my ear and listen to all that 100 audio files to make sure thereís nothing wrong. I donít want to use a lot of time to listen thru all that copied 100 audio files, thatís why I asked if I can trust those copied files. If I have issues I know how to track each step , but the thing here is , when copying 100 audio files, I donít know if thereís an issue or not, and I canít listen thru them all to check them.
The problem is , I donít know if the copy has caused any issue, maybe itís not like last time half of the audio turns into white noise, it could be only 1 second of white noise...

Thatís why I asked if if the target disk is in great shape,the copy completed without any errors, and the mount/unmount is successful, application like pro tools is closed totally before copying, then at this time should I trust the copy is perfect.

Southsidemusic 10-29-2017 10:19 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
How is anyone here gonna be able to assure you that "any" file copy is going to work? No one here will ever be able to ease your mind so try it and hope it works.

I for one would have thrown out that drive a long time ago and not wasted all this time here asking and asking .. if you know the drive is ****t why are you even trying to use it? You are asking for trouble here with this way of operating.

This whole thread (32 posts already) went wrong from the first post i.e I have a crap drive thats broken and I wanna use it for copying audio files .. Right there this went to hell and then kept going !! A drive is less than $50 and if you can't afford that instead of wasting time here with this "crap drive" maybe you should rethink this whole music venture. We all buy drives quite often wheather we like it or not as stuff breaks .. nothing new there and that applies to all things.

Lets put this thread to sleep now and move on ... please ...

Darryl Ramm 10-29-2017 10:36 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456922)
I have copied around 50 audio files(each file is one tracks) using a USB stick. I occasionally found 1 audio file has problem(half of that file turns into white noise) by ear human listening. Next time I’m going to copy 100 audio files, I want to know I can trust the copy, otherwise I’ll have to use my ear and listen to all that 100 audio files to make sure there’s nothing wrong. I don’t want to use a lot of time to listen thru all that copied 100 audio files, that’s why I asked if I can trust those copied files. If I have issues I know how to track each step , but the thing here is , when copying 100 audio files, I don’t know if there’s an issue or not, and I can’t listen thru them all to check them.
The problem is , I don’t know if the copy has caused any issue, maybe it’s not like last time half of the audio turns into white noise, it could be only 1 second of white noise...

That’s why I asked if if the target disk is in great shape,the copy completed without any errors, and the mount/unmount is successful, application like pro tools is closed totally before copying, then at this time should I trust the copy is perfect.

You are still asking the same nonsense stupid questions. And gobblegook about drives in "great shape" etc. What do you even mean by that? And how would you tell? (no I really don't want an answer).

I'm not asking you to guess what was going on I'm trying to help you see if you can work it out. Do you still have any of those files? On three different media? Why can't you go calculate their checksums? You apparently have not even looked to see if the file on disk really is different or if it's Pro Tools on a different system behaving like it is.

Next time you have to use you ear to confirm the files are all OK? Have you tried to read what has been written in this thread? Like that you could calculate checksums on those files, a one line shell command ("cksum *") to do that for every file in the session, likely takes a few seconds to do.

If you don't understand what a checksum is or how to calculate it you could ask (half this thread ago).

I don't think you've ever given a clear answer to the initial problem here, like how you copied the files, wether you were sure Pro Tools had closed the session or how you are unmounted the USB stick or what filesystems you have on things, wether you ran a filesystem check or looked at SMART status, etc. etc. Nothing.

All you are doing is a Dr. Szell impression and keep asking "Is it safe?". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzw1_2b-I7A

So yes its safe, very safe. And I can now ignore this thread.

Rockman413 10-29-2017 11:45 PM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Southsidemusic (Post 2456923)
How is anyone here gonna be able to assure you that "any" file copy is going to work? No one here will ever be able to ease your mind so try it and hope it works.

I for one would have thrown out that drive a long time ago and not wasted all this time here asking and asking .. if you know the drive is ****t why are you even trying to use it? You are asking for trouble here with this way of operating.

This whole thread (32 posts already) went wrong from the first post i.e I have a crap drive thats broken and I wanna use it for copying audio files .. Right there this went to hell and then kept going !! A drive is less than $50 and if you can't afford that instead of wasting time here with this "crap drive" maybe you should rethink this whole music venture. We all buy drives quite often wheather we like it or not as stuff breaks .. nothing new there and that applies to all things.

Lets put this thread to sleep now and move on ... please ...

Well unlike most of us who normally works at a studio, I travel a lot in a year and I am a very very frequent flyer, I carry all of hard drives very very frequent and fly with me, pack them, get them out, go thru airport security, put them in again... Youíll easily hit a hard drive or have one fall on the floor if your work requires you to fly a lot in a month, and nobody wants buy a bunch of hard drives every month. Everyoneís working condition is different so donít project your working condition to others. Iím only asking a technical question, and I expect answers from a technical side, not practical side.

Darryl Ramm 10-30-2017 12:13 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rockman413 (Post 2456930)
Well unlike most of us who normally works at a studio, I travel a lot in a year and I am a very very frequent flyer, I carry all of hard drives very very frequent and fly with me, pack them, get them out, go thru airport security, put them in again... You’ll easily hit a hard drive or have one fall on the floor if your work requires you to fly a lot in a month, and nobody wants buy a bunch of hard drives every month. Everyone’s working condition is different so don’t project your working condition to others. I’m only asking a technical question, and I expect answers from a technical side, not practical side.

You are not asking any technical questions here. You are asking nonsense questions with a few technical words sprinkled around them seeking some absolute assurance that nobody could possibly make.

Now what does dropping disk drives have to do with anything. Guess what if you drop a HDD you can lose everything on it. If you are worried about dropping disk drives why are you carrying HDD not SSD around with you? Where are your duplicate local backups? Remote backups, including backup for this to the cloud? Why are you experienced data loss and not tracked that down? Why are you using devices that may be damaged?

If I was working with you or looking to hire you I would be scared to death from what I'm reading here. If this is anything more than a hobby for you please find somebody to help you with data handling, backups etc.

Rockman413 10-30-2017 01:28 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Darryl Ramm (Post 2456933)
You are not asking any technical questions here. You are asking nonsense questions with a few technical words sprinkled around them seeking some absolute assurance that nobody could possibly make.

Now what does dropping disk drives have to do with anything. Guess what if you drop a HDD you can lose everything on it. If you are worried about dropping disk drives why are you carrying HDD not SSD around with you? Where are your duplicate local backups? Remote backups, including backup for this to the cloud? Why are you experienced data loss and not tracked that down? Why are you using devices that may be damaged?

If I was working with you or looking to hire you I would be scared to death from what I'm reading here. If this is anything more than a hobby for you please find somebody to help you with data handling, backups etc.


Well, you said you gonna ignore this posts, why are you still responding? Iíve post this thread in this forum and other forums and I just got clear answers from the good people of this forum and other forums. Iím not asking for your answers.

albee1952 10-30-2017 09:10 AM

Re: If I use a crap HD to copy audio files, would it cause any problems?
 
Last word of advice: every drive in history that has failed, worked fine right up until then:p

Rockman413 11-04-2017 02:06 AM

My Pro Tools audio file drive hit the floor at the airport
 
I fly to a city and spent hours recording with local musicians, mixing, and mastering and I get around 80 tracks ready.

My client want me to fly back to our city and copy the 80 tracks to my client, but the HDD/SDD which contains that 80 final mix tracks fall from the desk and hit the floor at the security check of the airport... When I got back to my studio, yes that HDD/SDD can still be read and I can still copy all the 80 audio tracks/files out, but can I trust that copied 80 audio tracks/files?

Should I listen thru all that 80 audio tracks one by one? It will take a lot of time...
(I have a experience of copying files using a crap USB stick, yes audio files can be copied using that USB stick but one audio file got corrupted : half length of that audio turns into white noise. White noise are easily found, but how about some hard-to-find problems such as a range of frequency are missing at extreme conditions?) (I've posted a similar post but that's focusing on technical side, now this is for practical side)

Thank you

Sardi 11-04-2017 03:36 AM

Re: My Pro Tools audio file drive hit the floor at the airport
 
Holy crap. This again? :(


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Southsidemusic 11-04-2017 03:45 AM

Re: My Pro Tools audio file drive hit the floor at the airport
 
This gotta be a joke right :rolleyes::eek: Thinkin' Merge time on this so he can use his own thread.

Who the Hell drops a harddrive in the airport floor?? Especially and mysteriously with 80tracks which was what he was on about in the other "never ending story" thread .... Can he see the future ???

We been recording on the go with artists like Avicii. SHM, Axwel and popstars for 10 years running thru hotelroom corridoors , airports and carparks looking for a rental etc etc and NEVER dropped any drives ever ...

Rockman413 11-04-2017 04:30 AM

Re: My Pro Tools audio file drive hit the floor at the airport
 
I took the flight 4 days ago, and it did happen because someone at the airport security check is reckless... Now this is for real life, I would appreciate answers on the how we should treat this on the technical side instead of accusing other people being careless or how imperfect the world is.


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