PDA

View Full Version : mac vs. pc? I need help choosing!


rdpete
10-09-1999, 06:22 PM
I would like to run PT on a notebook. Is this
possible? Which would be better, a mac or a pc? I would really appreciate some help here.
Pros/Cons?

please help!

rdpete

noisefloor
10-10-1999, 08:24 AM
Well, the mac version has more features (at least in 4.3.2) and more plugins (although supposedly NT will start to catch up at some point). And there's a much bigger installed base for the mac platform. Both platforms have some third party apps that are platform exclusive, but not that many (but you can run pc apps on a mac via emulation).


Mike

music
10-11-1999, 09:09 PM
MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC.

PC GOOD FOR ....
NEVERMIND
MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC MAC

ProTool1
10-12-1999, 12:12 AM
Damnit! I've said it before, and I will say it again, and I will continue to fight the war against sh@#ty computers.

PC's SUCK! Mac Forever http://www.digidesign.com/ubb/images/icons/smile.gif

Hope that helps.

Przemek
10-12-1999, 12:42 AM
I think that what will help more is the information that one cannot run PT on PC notebook http://www.digidesign.com/ubb/images/icons/smile.gif (or maybe http://www.digidesign.com/ubb/images/icons/frown.gif ?)
Przemek.

El Guapo
10-14-1999, 09:20 PM
I think when you are getting into a sophisticated application which must run stable (as opposed to not really mattering if it crashes) you should be very conservative. Digi has been on on the Mac since Day 1. I use a Tan G3/ OS 8.3 and it is rock solid. Stay away from the bleeding edge and you will spend more time recording.

GROS
10-14-1999, 10:07 PM
PC's are great for running office applications and s--t like that games e.t.c but for serious stuff like protools that require stability i would not recomend it.i guess i can say that because i have both mac and pc.

PC's really do suck

Stratman
10-31-1999, 08:26 PM
Do this same post on the Windows NT Digi board and compare the comments. If you don't care about having a lot of plug-ins and a stable OS for the next couple of years, then a PC should be just fine.

tnie
11-01-1999, 10:02 AM
The industry in more into Macs than PC unless your using an SGI or a Sun station. You'll have less trouble with a Mac and less set-up time. I work with both and for a Audio,Midi, Video...use a Mac;for office work use a PC.
Yes, look at both the Mac postings and the PC postings and compare problems and features and you'll see PC won't just be fine!!!!

Jonny Atack
11-01-1999, 02:29 PM
I have 2 PCs (Pentium II 300mhz) and 2 Mac 9600/350s. Personally, I intensely dislike our PCs and they get used now only for office work, which they don't even do that well due to frequent hangs under Win98 and the snail speed. Our Mac 9600/350s are stable in comparison.

In audio, the pros and studios mostly use Macs for interface preference and stability reasons, while many amateurs use PCs because they are less expensive and there are many cheap cards and plugs, etc. Your choice.

[Benjamin]
11-01-1999, 03:03 PM
WELL, for now, I'd have to say mac, and I prefer mac, in the long-run, I don't know if it matters that much, but if you're gonna use a notebook, you have to go with mac, especially since the fast G3 notebooks are as fast as stationary PC's.

------------------
[HYPERSONIC]

coaster
11-02-1999, 05:51 PM
you can buy food,

or you can starve.

you can buy a macintosh,

or you can buy a PRETEND macintosh.

SFXCraig
11-02-1999, 06:16 PM
I can't really say that the MacOS is any more stable than Windows NT, in fact, it's much LESS stable. If a program crashes, it has the ability to take down the whole OS with it.. try to force quit and nothing happens, then you must reboot (sound familiar??) The WinNT kernel, on the other hand, allocates a specific space for each application to occupy. Programs cannot directly access hardware or other programs, they must interact through the NT kernel. Thus, if something chunks, it doesn't kill your OS. You simply quit out of the program, and start it up again. NT remains unaffected.

That's reason 1. Reason 2 is even more compelling. MacOS is does not preemptively multitask. Nearly anything you do in MacOS can be completely halted by clicking on the apple in the corner and bringing down the menu. Try it - watch how your screen doesn't update, your background applications stop, and about the only thing that DOES keep happening is your audio plays. This is a HUGE waste of processing power, not to mention productivity in the studio! Until Mac gets their heads on straight and writes a decent OS, the software will continue to be the limiting factor of otherwise decent hardware.

This is why I still use PCs for everything else that I do. They're simply more effecient for doing more than one thing at a time..

-Craig

(can't wait to get flamed for this post!) http://www.digidesign.com/ubb/images/icons/smile.gif

coaster
11-02-1999, 06:33 PM
Craig, you have some good arguements. this is not an easy subject to answer. how often do you get "the blue screen of death" on your NT? i am on an NT now and while it doesn't crash often, it does crash more than my mac. it's also interesting that while the NT i use has a faster processor than my mac, the computer is a lot slower in processing, booting, and networking. (actually i don't network my mac, but we have a G3 lab at work w/25 g3's hooked together)
my point is, NT crashes too, and crashes hard. if you want stability, i suggest you buy a $12k sgi. i have used these, and whil their is no protools, these machines are like mac and ibm and unix smashed into one box. sgi's are extremely stable, untill you DO crash them and then it's almost always a tape backup of the kernel required (suck!)
if you are the only person using a mac or pc, you should be able to stablize your environment. multiple users tend to mess things up, even with login and root/users systems. I try to be unbiased as i can, as ALL computers are very cool and are of some use to somebody.

***except IBM's - they suck!***

FA! FA! FA!

(have a nice day!)
-coaster

Disco_Doctor
11-02-1999, 07:05 PM
I can't really say that the MacOS is any more stable than Windows NT, in fact, it's much LESS stable. If a program crashes, it has the ability to take down the whole OS with it..

I'm a die hard Mac advocate and I'll admit that under normal circumstances, the above statement is true. BUT...

The WinNT kernel, on the other hand, allocates a specific space for each application to occupy. Programs cannot directly access hardware or other programs, they must interact through the NT kernel. Thus, if something chunks, it doesn't kill your OS. You simply quit out of the program, and start it up again. NT remains unaffected.

This statement is true when you're talking about running apps like Netscape or Microsoft Word, but it is not true in the context of Pro Tools. If Pro Tools crashes on NT, the OS is probably going to crash too, and even if it doesn't, you're going to have to restart anyway because the DSP memory wasn't properly released and so on...

Reason 2 is even more compelling. MacOS is does not preemptively multitask....This is a HUGE waste of processing power...

Why? Again, if we're talking in the context of Pro Tools, it isn't that big of a deal. Also, your statement isn't entirely true. I can run Pro Tools, Studiovision Pro, SampleCell, and Galaxy simultaneously on my Mac, and yes, if I click on a menu the screen might stop updating, but everything will continue to play, and all of the applications in the background will continue to function. Preemptive multitasking actually makes real time video/audio applications less efficient, since they have to contend with the operating system divvying out the processing power.

The bottom line is if you want to run Pro Tools and have the choice of all the plugins and a large user base from which to draw support and advice, the only way to go is to get a Mac.

http://www.digidesign.com/ubb/images/icons/smile.gif

snoopy
11-02-1999, 07:20 PM
You can talk techno jargon days on end. but as a user of both systems i can tell you this. My reason for using a Mac system for protools and not NT (I could easily swap the hardware at no additional cost to me)is productivity. The mac requires much less attention and maint. for me. When I have clients, I don't have time to trouble-shoot or waste if something goes wrong. Bottom line is that I end up with a lot more productive time on the mac than with NT, no matter how many technical advantages NT may have. And I have seen NT come crashing to its knees. Protools bypasses the OS for a lot of stuff that most apps use the OS for (I imagine due to all the disk access).

This is the same reason I use Studio Vision instead of logic. Logic is obviously superior, but for me, I get more productivity out of visions simple interface.

I also remember hearing somewhere that you couldn't run protools with NT on a laptop, but I may be wrong about that.

SFXCraig
11-02-1999, 09:40 PM
Well, here's where I wish MacOS would preemptively multitask - when I'm trying to back up my 1500 MB session in the background but can't because Mezzo doesn't do ANYTHING while audio is playing. Admittedly, NT isn't crash-proof, but for most things it is more crash resistant. I have no idea how ProTools works under NT since I don't use it on NT. And hey, if I were getting a brand new ProTools system today, I'd still get it on a Mac. The plug-ins are all available, it's more stable simply because of the amount of time Digi has programmed it, and it probably runs faster due to the same reasons. I'm just trying to stick up for the PC here.. http://www.digidesign.com/ubb/images/icons/smile.gif All things being equal though, I'd rather be working on an NT system so I at least have the remote possibility of getting more done in the background..

-Craig

CStern
11-03-1999, 12:56 AM
Macs are way more stable and are also easier to use. They also retain their usefulness longer... they don't go obsolete as quickly as PC's do.

Enrico Donner
11-03-1999, 03:21 AM
My two cents for.......


..... THE MAC !!!

(and you'll never regret)!

Corcharge
11-03-1999, 04:26 PM
Hey Craig,
I use Retrospect with PT on a Mac and Retro backs up during play and record.Maybe your computer platform isn't the problem.
Cory

SFXCraig
11-04-1999, 03:49 PM
Hmm.. is Retro a 4mm DAT format, and if so, can it read Mezzo tapes? Our Mezzo system is getting real buggy on us..

(Getting off topic, but oh well!)

Corcharge
11-05-1999, 10:59 AM
Retro works with many formats.I'm using 4mm DAT as well.I can honestly say that after 4 years of B.U.& restore there hasn't been a single problem.I hope it's more than good luck!

Cory

dBHEAD
11-05-1999, 11:34 AM
Hey Craig:

What kind of speeds are we talking about with Retro? Mezzo claims between 30 and 50 megabytes per minute; I've found it averages about 35.

I find tape back-ups to be annoying because of the time element involved so ANYTHING which could speed them up would be of interest.

SFXCraig
11-06-1999, 07:48 PM
Our Mezzo isn't very good at all - I'd LOVE to get 35 megs/minute! We get 10 megs/minute, which is basically 2x realtime playback speed for our 44.1k audio.. we're using an HP drive by Grey Matter Response - I forget the actual model number of the drive (not at the studio now) - any ways to speed it up? It's on the Mac SCSI bus now.. ? Thanks!

-Craig