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View Full Version : How many hours can be spend on the mix?


smcoptyltd
09-13-2005, 03:08 AM
Never had at this stage. I'm mixing a song and in last couple days ( 8 hours I think ) and I've notice that still maybe 1-3 hours and than the mix will be ready.

I mean adjusting mainly levels, amount of reverb, some gentle EQ etc. I've noticed that in many cases when I touch one instrument, the whole section seems to get crazy. In other words, when is right balance, all feels good and even 0.5 Db up or down can make a difference.

It's 32 tracks.

For monitoring I have 2 pairs of speakers and a pair of headphones.

Any hints???

How long it can take to make it perfect?

R1ch
09-13-2005, 04:10 AM
Man that's a question only you can answer.

It's all down to personal discretion I would have to hear the mix myself then make an opinion.

Andre Knecht
09-13-2005, 07:13 AM
Man, mixing is such a deep and wide subject, one could write a whole book about it. And would you believe, thatís exactly what a few crazy lunatics did. Go ahead - live a little and treat yourself! You could be the 8th person to do so.

Mark Reis
09-13-2005, 07:48 AM
According to my current project and schedule, we can spend 15 minutes on each mix if I don't eat or sleep.

-Mark

smcoptyltd
09-13-2005, 07:53 AM
Man, mixing is such a deep and wide subject, one could write a whole book about it



Of course. I'm talking about levels and automation.

The mix can sound so different, good, brilliant or bad, just with different levels and I'm not talking about some ridiculously crazy levels.

I'm talking about mixing a ballad and levels of pad, vocals, bass and drums, some acoustic guitar.

Realizm
09-13-2005, 11:08 AM
How long should a mix take? I've worked with engineers that mixed records fairly quickly, say 4-6 hours and the song sounds stellar....I've seen engineers labor over mixes in locked out rooms for more than a day. But it really depends on your skill level and point of departure --- by that I mean if you track well and don't have to "fix" alot of stuff, you should be fairly in a decent position concerning your rough mix as far as levels/balance go. Of course I don't know what your room sounds like...i.e., if you have a bass buildup problem it could lead your mixes to be bass deficient, Or you could have a combination of problems at different frequencies which is usuall the case with personal project studios because we don't have spec'd out rooms etc....Personally, IMO, I think you should A/B your mixes with similar program material as you go along and tweak it. Burn a few alternate passes with whatever elements you have doubts about +/- 1 or 2 dB...Reference your mixes on different systems...Take notes. Throw your mix back up and tweak it from there. After you've done that enough to really know what your room sounds like it'll become easier to be confident about subsequent "first mixes" because you'll be pretty much "in the ballpark".

Cheers

Andre Knecht
09-13-2005, 05:26 PM
Of course. I'm talking about levels and automation.

The mix can sound so different, good, brilliant or bad, just with different levels and I'm not talking about some ridiculously crazy levels.

I'm talking about mixing a ballad and levels of pad, vocals, bass and drums, some acoustic guitar.




Sorry, no-can-do. People have had their PT rigs confiscated for revealing that formula. Especially the one for ballads.

OK, hereís an actual tip. Listen to your mix with the computer monitor turned off (or your eyes closed). What are your ears telling you?

Mixing is not just about levels. Itís about soundstaging. Itís about creating the illusion of width, depth (and some would say height). Itís about placing elements in spaces and managing their interaction. Itís about dynamics. Itís about the arc of a piece, as well as moment-to-moment relationships. Itís about conveying emotion, engaging a listener along a sensorial journey. No amount automation is going to help creating a good mix unless you take the whole into account.

There are many techniques involved in handling all the above. Learn them.

smcoptyltd
09-13-2005, 06:37 PM
Yeah Andree... Now you are talking!



In other words, with automation I can achieve elements you are talking about. To be perfectly honest, I'm mixing on PT for 10 years, learning on this NG and lately I'm getting good results. My current mix has great sound, is exciting and without thinking about elements you have mentioned, I think I'm very close and I have to listen again and observe all elements you are talking about.

I think is a magic man made. I'm sucker for ballads and I think I can deliver something nice.

If I'll finish that song, I'll post for an evaluation.

Thanks for your help.





Regards time, Realizm, I think it takes me right time, because I'm mixing without any pressure and taking it very easy. Thanks for hints.

I love DUC.

Tony Shepperd
09-16-2005, 05:27 PM
On average you can usually make a mix sound good in 2 to 4 hours. Tweaking could take forever. LOL
Most of the mixes I have done lately are between 80 to 120 tracks and it only takes a little longer than a song with 32 tracks.
A lot of it really comes down to who has the final say. There are some producers who just want to tweak the song until hell freezes over.

superpenguin79
09-16-2005, 05:57 PM
as Lynn Fuston mentioned I believe.... "a mix is never finished.. it is done when the client runs out of money" as engineers, we never run out of things to "tweak, or mix" hehe go with it in a reasonable amount of time that you set and set that as your limit. Your ears will thank you in the long run..

worldsend
09-17-2005, 04:29 AM
i could spent days and weeks on just one song as long as it is not boring me or pissing me off in some way. somehow it is also depending on how you feel personally on the mixing day. thats why i mostly try to be very relaxed with a nice cup of coffee and some fine food. of course when not mixing for the bands i work for as a producer (working that way means they do not pay for the mix so that i have enough time to realise my vision) time is often really short and when i tell people that mixing two song a day is the maximum for a recording i tracked (or a recording that was tracked professionally somewhere else) clients often are really shocked. hehe. when mixing some recording that was done at a homerecording kind of studio i can manage to get a nice mix done in two days for 10 songs to keep the costs more down. depends on the client and the music.

sirpucho
09-19-2005, 07:29 AM
No correct answer does it sound good ? It's finished then

My fastest ever mix of simple traditional funk/soul song of about 16 tracks 1 hour 45 minutes and it sounded great.

My longest was an indie pop song of around 68+ tracks + artist problems = 36hours approx (3 working days) it did sound great but the material just demanded more effort.

A well arranged and played song will also mix itself to a certain degree as every musical part is there for a reason and isn't crowding out anything else in the frequency spectrum so less EQ needed as will a well recorded track for the same reasons.